Cloverbuds Deserve Great Volunteers

Think back to the days of being 5, 6, and 7 years old. Life was full of adventure-playing outdoors, learning the a-b-c's to read exciting books, and feeling the power of adding and subtracting numbers. And don't forget such important lessons as learning to do things exactly like the teacher wants, and dealing with the neighborhood bully.

Adults were major influences to each of us when we were 5, 6, and 7 years of age. And the same is true today, whether the adult is a parent, aunt, uncle, babysitter, teacher, day-care assistant, swimming instructor, or 4-H club volunteer. As the child's self-esteem is beginning to take shape, each adult has the power to build and enhance the youngster's esteem, as well as the power to shatter the child's ego with a cross word, a nasty look, or making the child the butt of a joke.

Knowing the delicate nature of a cloverbud's self-esteem, it makes common sense that Ohio State 4-H would insist on having high quality volunteers to work with this young audience. The organization would be irresponsible with the care and education of these younger members to allow a volunteer who might cause harm to any of the children. Likewise, 4-H parents assume (and rightfully so) that their children will be safe while participating in 4-H activities.

Therefore, Ohio 4-H has adopted the Ohio 4-H Volunteer Standards of Behavior as a tool to insure the safety and well-being of all 4-H participants. Ohio 4-H also recognizes that being a 4-H volunteer is a privilege rather than a right. So, the Ohio 4-H Volunteer Standards of Behavior serve as the guide to which the actions of volunteers, who have signed this contractual agreement, can be compared in circumstances of potential harm to the youth. The standards also serve as a guide by which adults applying to be 4-H volunteers must measure up.

Upholding 4-H volunteers to the Standards of Behavior better guarantees that Cloverbuds will develop positive self-esteems and learn appropriate skills by which they can successfully negotiate the twists and curves on their road of life. In other words, Cloverbuds deserve volunteers who meet or exceed the Ohio 4-H Volunteer Standards of Behavior.

For more information please contact Kirk Bloir.